Cankultur at the end of an age

The difficulty a serious Christian writer faces in this country, when speaking of the cultural revolution (or coup d’état?) that displaces the spontaneous flowering of authentic culture, is that there are no gulags or torture chambers we can point to as evidence that anything remotely like suppression afflicts us. The tragedy, the high drama of the writer’s struggle under overt totalitarianism, is in such stark contrast to the minor trials of the Western writer, that most people consider our situation benign, and our complaints grossly exaggerated. In my opinion, it is precisely our situation that may in the long run prove more deadly to the preservation of “the national heart, the national memory.”


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Subsidiarity in Art

Subsidiarity is the principle which states that freedoms and their inherent responsibilities are best managed by the smallest competent authority at the level most appropriate to the nature of the persons involved. For example, the family, not the state, is the “first teacher” of the family’s children. Governments may assist the family if parents are unable to exercise their subsidiarity, but the state should do so only as a subsidiary function, performing only those tasks which cannot be performed effectively at a more immediate or personal level. In other words, the government and its administrative organs, such as a department of Education, must serve the family, and not the other way around.

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The Father’s Tale

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The Father’s Tale is the story of Alex Graham, a quiet middle-age man waiting to die. A widower with two sons, he is the owner-manager of a small town bookshop, considered by all who know him to be a “boring man, an unimportant man,” and he is contented to be so. When one of his sons disappears without explanation or any hint of where he has gone, the father begins a long journey that takes him for the first time away from his safe and orderly world. As he stumbles across the merest thread of a trail, he follows it in blind desperation and is led step by step on an odyssey that brings him to fascinating places and sometimes to frightening people and perils.

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Interview with Lifesite News

Michael O’Brien responds to his critics re: Harry Potter

by Steve Jalsevac

July 26, 2011

http://www.lifesitenews.com/

 

The July 18 LifeSiteNews story, Harry Potter expert criticizes Vatican newspaper’s glowing review of Deathly Hallows 2, was widely read and elicited many comments both pro and con, especially regarding the statements of Potter critic Michael O’Brien. In response to this, LifeSiteNews conducted an additional, in depth interview with O’Brien to allow him to expand on his views and respond to some of the 72 reader comments entered beneath the original story.

In the interview O’Brien explains why he became involved in critiquing the Harry Potter series, his views on why the series has become so popular and the astonishing and at times hateful criticism that Potter critics have received, such as O’Brien himself being called “the anti-Christ” by a Potter fan. O’Brien also answers the question of what he meant by “the evil means” used by Harry to defeat Voldemort, why Harry Potter is not just “entertainment”, why it is appropriate for LifeSiteNews to cover the Harry Potter issue, how Rowlings pro-homosexual views may be reflected in the novels, and more:

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Mali Andjeo—the Small Angel

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The Small Angel, a children’s book that I wrote for my nieces and nephews more than forty years ago was published by the White Horse Press, Canada, in the 1990’s. It has since gone out of print. The Small Angel has been republished in the Croatian language under the title Mali An?eo (pronounced mali andjeo) by Treci Dan publishers in Zagreb, Croatia, with delightful new illustrations by Dijana Ko?ica, a gifted illustrator of children’s books.

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Sexual abuse in the Church

Articles in the media have reported on my presentation at  a conference on sexual abuse in the Church, held  in Ottawa this past March… The criminal abuser in my own past, a man who had damaged the lives of so many boys, was convicted under law as a “dangerous sexual offender,” was released after nine years in prison and then went on to apply to enter a Canadian seminary. He was accepted by the then-archbishop with full knowledge of the man’s past, a fact which came out during a later civil trial, after the man had been ordained a priest. Now the full story is a matter of public record.


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Mediated Media—Anton Casta

 

Man is also media to himself insofar as he represents his actualized personhood imperfectly.  On a Christian level, we can comment further — man as the tabernacle of the Holy Spirit, “represents” or “mediates” his charge, his divine potential, imperfectly. Christians can speak of man as image (living art), or word (living literature), or as man as media — in terms of dialogue within the universal call to evangelization and the renewed call to engage in that dialogue in the “new” media. For Pope John Paul II , the term “new” here denotes the application of the unchanging Gospel message into the world of new media.

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Film of Father Elijah

For the past several years, many of you have written to me to say that you believe my novel Father Elijah would make an excellent film. A number of film companies have felt the same. Since the book was first published in 1996, I recall at least eight film-makers in North America and Europe approaching me to discuss a film.



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John Paul II’s Biblical Way of the Cross

Building on the worldwide interest in the Biblical way of the Cross established by Pope John Paul II, authors Amy Wellborn and Michael Dubruiel have written meditations that invite readers to walk with Christ from Gethsemane to his death and … Continue reading